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What was and is so powerful about this hashtag is the fact that thousands of tweets detailed the daily experience of being a woman, and the fear and hate we come across no matter where we are. It exposed behavior that we are so often told to be quiet about because we are “too sensitive” or “overreacting.” Multiple men on Twitter admitted that they didn’t even realize this was happening before reading tweets that were part of the hashtag. #YesAllWomen not only educated people on something they had little experience with, it also challenged them to examine their behavior in a way they likely hadn’t done before.

It is also important to mention the #YesAllWhiteWomen hashtag, which came shortly after #YesAllWomen, to address the fact that there is privilege in being a white woman versus being a woman of color. The tag #YesAllWhiteWomen gave women of color a space to address the differences in experiences and to highlight the struggles that are unique to them. Twitter allows for multiple conversations to occur at once, for different groups to gather and share their individual stories. Outside of Twitter, there are few places where this kind of widespread organic conversation is possible.

thenewwomensmovement:

A Woman Wore A Hidden Camera To Show How Many Times In A Day She Gets Harassed.

Jen Corey was crowned Miss DC in 2009 and made it to the top 10 of the Miss America Pageant in 2010. A tall and striking blonde, Jen has battled with overzealous men approaching her since she was a teenager. An incident at a D.C. bar prompted her to use her platform as a beauty queen to speak out against street harassment, a topic that is often dismissed as just ‘boys being boys.’ But Jen and other women argue that there is something more sinister that lies beneath the motivation to aggressively cat-call or approach women in public places: “Street harassment is almost never about sex. It’s about power. Which is the same way we view rape. So saying street harassment is not a big deal is opening up the doorway for men to view women as an object to be obtained.” 

Some people will come from two, three hours away. They don’t even have a car. Somebody brought them. They paid someone to bring them here two different times. That shows you how desperate a woman would be to get this taken care of. She rode the Greyhound bus from wherever she came from, got a taxi here, then had to call a taxi to take her back.
Shannon Brewer-Anderson, clinic director of the last abortion clinic in Mississippi, on the lengths women will go to seek out abortion care

seachangeprogram:

Emily and Renee both shared their abortion experiences over the last week. Sometimes, when people share their abortion stories in public, the loudest voices they hear in response are anti-abortion bullies calling them selfish, sluts, or murderers. We want Emily & Renee to know that they are loved, supported, and respected. And we want to send a message to anyone who wants to share their abortion story: we stand with you, no matter what the bullies say! 

Share these images to show your solidarity with Emily and Renee, and with all people who share their abortion stories. 

For some reason, feminism is seen as super anti: anti-men, anti-sex, anti-sexism, anti-everything. And while some of those antis aren’t bad things, it’s not exactly exciting to get involved in something that’s seen as so consistently negative. The good news is, feminism isn’t all about antis. It’s progressive and—as cheesy as this sounds—it’s all about making your life better. As different as we all are, there’s one thing most young women have in common: We’re all brought up to feel like there’s something wrong with us. We’re too fat. We’re dumb. We’re too smart. We’re not ladylike enough—stop cursing, chewing with your mouth open, speaking your mind. We’re too slutty. We’re not slutty enough. Fuck that. You’re not too fat. You’re not too loud. You’re not too smart. You’re not unladylike. There is nothing wrong with you.
Jessica Valenti, Full Frontal Feminism (via feimineach)
I was faced with seeing women all the time who had unplanned pregnancies. So that started a 12-year path of wrestling with the morality of providing abortion care. [In the end,] I felt obligated ethically, morally, and spiritually. So I did.
Dr. Willie Parker, one of two abortion providers who commute to Mississippi’s only abortion clinic, on his decision to become an provide abortion care. 
micdotcom:

One chart says it all about the government and female bodies 

We’re only halfway through 2014, and state legislators have already introduced a whopping 468 restrictions intended to limit, control or otherwise regulate women’s reproductive rights.
How many comparable bills have been introduced to regulate men’s reproductive health care during this period? Zero. 
Something’s very wrong with this picture.
What would restricting male reproductive rights even look like? | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

One chart says it all about the government and female bodies 

We’re only halfway through 2014, and state legislators have already introduced a whopping 468 restrictions intended to limit, control or otherwise regulate women’s reproductive rights.

How many comparable bills have been introduced to regulate men’s reproductive health care during this period? Zero. 

Something’s very wrong with this picture.

What would restricting male reproductive rights even look like? | Follow micdotcom

I have not begun to worry. I wouldn’t have passed a bill that I didn’t believe was constitutional.
Rep. Katrina Jackson, the Louisiana state lawmaker who sponsored the state’s admitting privileges law, on the possibility that the law is threatened after a federal appeals court struck down a similar Mississippi law.